Hey, guys. I've made a character for my own little stop motion film idea that I had to do as a project but i never really got to make a short film or even a 10 second clip of animation for that character. I am so excited to learn more about stop motion and become a successful animator but my only issue is that I'm nervous about starting and I don't know what I should start with. I would love to create short stories that I could develop into 1 or 1 and a half minute long animations with not too simple characters. I'm really into detail and I'm a HUGE perfectionist when it comes to pretty much everything I do. I feel like I should start off with writing a story, then going into designing characters and then animating an entire sequence. I don't know if that's a good place to start or if it sounds like a dumb idea. Any advice is greatly appreciated and it would mean a lot to me to know how some of you guys started because I'm honestly blown away by the photos and videos I've seen on this site!

Views: 136

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

kek, first of all, it takes time and patience.

but here's a good advice, that i learned for few months, while i do work with animation.

do not plan ANY SERIOUS WORK with animation, if you dont try it already. i mean, you want to create something, but if you didn't create something same later, you will face with a huge trouble ... "pitfalls'' in all that you do, and then you need to start all over again, with expirience that you gain from this try :)

so put away for the time that you do now, and try to copy something easy, like that:

or that:

and then, if you get the result, then you can do all the rest UuU

p.s, here's some good guides too, from another cool guy https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-0M1nQcZVUoB3hI45-Y2Zfuol9s... ;)

Three tips (on top of the brilliant advice from Serge)

1. Read up / watch videos on timings for animation. I'd fully recommend The Animator's Survival Kit.

2. Keep your first projects small scale and short - you get a sense of achievement from following through and completing a mini project before venturing into commiting to something larger scale.

3. Plan, plan and plan some more - script, storyboard, shoot video reference, make puppets which can do everything you need them to and sets that are sturdy.

Don't worry about absolute perfection - a slight roughness around the edges has charm.

As with all advice, take this with a pinch of salt and find your own path.

I think you are on the right track, aiming for 1 minute to 1 1/2 minute short animations to start with.  Some people want to make a feature film, before they have ever animated one second, and they never get anywhere.  And it makes it more interesting if there is some kind of story to it, rather than just doing walking tests, but you need to get a feel for the basics with a few short tests.  

At the absolute beginning, make just one puppet, like you have, and do try animating it.  You will work through a few problems, and may need to re-think some of it, and it's better to do that with one puppet than by making 2 or 3 puppets at the same time, then finding the armatures aren't strong enough to support them, or they can't perform some action that is needed, or wires break because you bent them with pliers and nicked the wire, or many other things.  If you have problems with how your puppet works, there are a few Youtube tutorials around on puppet making, from Bluworm, me (Stopmonick channel),  Stop Motion Magazine, and others.  If your puppet does what you need, that's a great start and you know how to build your next puppet.

Do start with just a test animation, before building lots of sets or making elaborate costumes, just to start getting the feel of the puppet.  You can still be thinking about the short film you want to make, but go ahead and try the puppet out.   You might also discover other things to sort out with lighting or camera or how you make the set, and make some adjustments.  After a couple of tests you will find you can do it better,  so then you can get onto your short film.

Do use a frame grabber, like Dragonframe, so you can see instantly how much you have moved the puppet each frame, and what sort of speed it seems to be moving at.  If you want to try it out first without spending the money, there is a trial version.  Or if you don't want to put the money into a Canon DSLR camera yet, you can use free apps on an iPhone or iPad , like Stop Motion Studio, which give you the same feedback. (I tested it on my channel.)

I really appreciate your advice, Serge! I think it's a great idea to copy the video links to get a feel for animating objects first before planning any serious work. I'll definitely get started on this soon once I have some free time, I'm really looking forward to start animating. Thanks again! 

Serge Taganski said:

kek, first of all, it takes time and patience.

but here's a good advice, that i learned for few months, while i do work with animation.

do not plan ANY SERIOUS WORK with animation, if you dont try it already. i mean, you want to create something, but if you didn't create something same later, you will face with a huge trouble ... "pitfalls'' in all that you do, and then you need to start all over again, with expirience that you gain from this try :)

so put away for the time that you do now, and try to copy something easy, like that:

or that:

and then, if you get the result, then you can do all the rest UuU

p.s, here's some good guides too, from another cool guy https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL-0M1nQcZVUoB3hI45-Y2Zfuol9s... ;)

Thank you so much for your advice! I actually spent most of my summer vacation last year watching stop motion tutorials and I eventually came across your YouTube channel. I think your style is undeniably spectacular and very genuine. I would love to get a feel for the basics first and, after some time, ease my way into more tests. When I made my first puppet, I actually followed your build up puppet tutorial. I had a lot of trouble finding latex so I ended up just adding more urethane foam onto the body and tightening parts by wrapping string around them several times, which is why I had to cover the entire body of the character with clothing. I would like to get into making tie-downs for my puppets so I'll be able to animate them properly once I build a set in the future.

Also, I have tried finding limitations to my puppet and I found that the pants I made for the puppet really cut off a lot of movement in the thighs. I also need to make the neck wires thicker by overlapping two pieces instead of just using one. Although, that was my own mistake for not following the instructions properly.

I've done a small amount of research on Dragonframe just to see what the software can do for an animator and I think it's great. I would love to begin saving up for Dragonframe as soon as possible, as well as a Canon DSLR camera. I'll be sure to use the free trial as well as some of the apps available on an iPhone. I appreciate you taking the time to reply to my post. Thank you!



StopmoNick said:

I think you are on the right track, aiming for 1 minute to 1 1/2 minute short animations to start with.  Some people want to make a feature film, before they have ever animated one second, and they never get anywhere.  And it makes it more interesting if there is some kind of story to it, rather than just doing walking tests, but you need to get a feel for the basics with a few short tests.  

At the absolute beginning, make just one puppet, like you have, and do try animating it.  You will work through a few problems, and may need to re-think some of it, and it's better to do that with one puppet than by making 2 or 3 puppets at the same time, then finding the armatures aren't strong enough to support them, or they can't perform some action that is needed, or wires break because you bent them with pliers and nicked the wire, or many other things.  If you have problems with how your puppet works, there are a few Youtube tutorials around on puppet making, from Bluworm, me (Stopmonick channel),  Stop Motion Magazine, and others.  If your puppet does what you need, that's a great start and you know how to build your next puppet.

Do start with just a test animation, before building lots of sets or making elaborate costumes, just to start getting the feel of the puppet.  You can still be thinking about the short film you want to make, but go ahead and try the puppet out.   You might also discover other things to sort out with lighting or camera or how you make the set, and make some adjustments.  After a couple of tests you will find you can do it better,  so then you can get onto your short film.

Do use a frame grabber, like Dragonframe, so you can see instantly how much you have moved the puppet each frame, and what sort of speed it seems to be moving at.  If you want to try it out first without spending the money, there is a trial version.  Or if you don't want to put the money into a Canon DSLR camera yet, you can use free apps on an iPhone or iPad , like Stop Motion Studio, which give you the same feedback. (I tested it on my channel.)

Thank you for you advice! I've heard much about the The Animator's Survival Kit, I intend on checking it out soon. I agree that making the first projects short is a good idea, and that planning is essential. I hope to find my own path soon and I would like to thank you again for taking the time to read my post and respond to it. :)



The Disused Yeti said:

Three tips (on top of the brilliant advice from Serge)

1. Read up / watch videos on timings for animation. I'd fully recommend The Animator's Survival Kit.

2. Keep your first projects small scale and short - you get a sense of achievement from following through and completing a mini project before venturing into commiting to something larger scale.

3. Plan, plan and plan some more - script, storyboard, shoot video reference, make puppets which can do everything you need them to and sets that are sturdy.

Don't worry about absolute perfection - a slight roughness around the edges has charm.

As with all advice, take this with a pinch of salt and find your own path.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Teen Animation Festival International 2017

MESSAGE BOARD CATEGORIES

STOPMO NEWBIES
basic stopmo discussion

ANIMATOR TALK
experienced animators looking to improve

CAMERA & STAGE
animation camera, lighting and moco rigs

ANIMATION TOOLS & EQUIPMENT
animation tool and rigging discussion

STOP MOTION & COMPUTERS
frame capture, editing, and post-production

STORY
script, storyboarding and storyreel discussion

SOUND
lip-sync, sound effects and music

YOUR STOPMO FILM PROJECT
discuss your stopmo film

ARMATURES
ball & socket and wire armature discussion

MACHINE SHOP
metalwork tool & talk

SCULPTING
sculpture information and advice

HAIR & COSTUME
materials, patterns and technique

CASTING
foam, silicone and resin

CLAY
clay puppet construction

GENERAL PUPPET MAKING
other puppet fabrication issues

STOP MOTION SETS
set design and construction information

MODEL DEPARTMENT
miniature prop discussion

MATTE PAINTINGS
glass matte paintings and backgrounds

GENERAL SPECIAL EFFECTS

STOP MOTION FILM DISCUSSION

FAVORITE STOP MOTION CHARACTERS

PRO ANIMATOR DISCUSSION

FILM FESTIVALS AND EVENTS

ANIMATION SCHOOLS

STOP MOTION BOOKS

STOP MOTION ON VIDEO

JOBS & PROJECTS
post here if you are looking for talent to hire

SWAP MEET
stop motion items for sale

CHAT BOARD
general discussion

SITE FEEDBACK
report bugs, comments and suggestions here

BLOGS

Create a Blog for your personal page. Go to My Page and click on Blog Posts. Access all Blog Posts here.

SPAM ALERT!

StopMotionAnimation.com has been hit hard by spammers lately. They have been creating several fake accounts every day, contacting and harassing members and posting suspicious content. If you see anything suspicious, don't click on any links, instead, send me their User Name. I will suspend them. 

Questions & Feedback
Report Spam or Abuse

© 2017   Created by Anthony Scott.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

.xg_widget_forum_index_index .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;} .xg_widget_forum_topic_listForCategory .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;} .xg_widget_forum_topic_show .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;}