Workbench for short 'Shed'.
Sort of based on my own bench. Fabricated from card, wood, and bits found in dusty jars at the back of cupboards

Comment by Dennis Heinzeroth on July 22, 2018 at 9:45am
I'm looking at this on my phone, in the sunlight, so I wasn't sure if this was a set for your film or an actual full-size workbench! Nice job! What scale is it?
Comment by Pete Pipkins on July 22, 2018 at 9:56am

Hi

Thanks for your comment, I've literally just joined up.

It's 1/8 scale, based on my own workbench. It's all scratch built from card and stuff.

It was for a short film I made a year or two ago.

Pete

Comment by Pete Pipkins on July 22, 2018 at 10:52am

If you're interested, here's a shot of the full set:

Pete

Comment by Simon Tytherleigh on July 22, 2018 at 2:54pm

Very neat. I like the way you have ensured things are matted down so they don't look miniature, e.g. the floor. Excellent work!

Comment by Pete Pipkins on July 23, 2018 at 10:22am

Hi

Thanks for the comment. I use wood stains and water based paints (acrylics and watercolours). The floor is inscribed plywood to give the plank effect, I exaggerate the grain by dragging a wire brush in the direction of the ply grain, stain it with wood stain and then rub black ink into it to pull up the detail. 

Pete

Comment by StopmoNick on July 23, 2018 at 6:50pm

Nice!  I especially like the bench grinder with stone and buffing wheel, and the drill press.  

I did a workbench for some of my films, but it was in a larger 1:6 scale, which makes it a bit easier.  So well done, getting it to look so good in the smaller size!   I found some novelty miniature tools, like pliers and monkey wrench, that were made to go on keyrings, but also made stuff myself like a claw hammer and hacksaw.  Mine looked bit like my own workbench, too.  

Typed this yesterday but got interrupted and didn't post.  I see you have now posted a video!

I couldn't make out what was on the table, but looking at the still here, I guess it is a figure, missing a head and a couple of limbs. The lack of a recognisable part like a head or hand made it hard to tell.   The view through the windows is a nice shot, but the film would benefit from a couple of other camera angles, like maybe a closeup of what he is doing with his tools.  

Comment by Pete Pipkins on July 24, 2018 at 1:29pm

Hi

Thanks for your feedback, much appreciated. This started off merely as an exercise, it just sort of grew into a more rounded scene. It was intentional that you couldn't wholly see what he's doing, but I probably occluded a bit too much. It's a subject I may revisit one day, I like to explore ideas around 'not knowing' I'm naturally drawn to the unheimlich :)

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