Hi!
First of all I'm sorry for intrusion.

I need some replies to some questions from animators for my masters!
If you could answer some questions about you work it would be really helpful!

(1-5) 1=not important 3- neutral 5-Very important

just copy paste!   Thank you!    and I'm really sorry for the trouble!

If you want to help you can either send me a message or reply here!

Name:

Animations you have worked on:

Position in the team(s):

 

For you! What is the major difference between stop motion and Computer animation

Is it important to leave clues like fingerprints and small defects so audiences know that is manufactured (1-5)

Stop motion benefits from 3D Printing (1-5)

Should Stop motion use CG effects Yes/No (just a little is a yes :P)

having a Making-off is important (1-5) | Why...

For you! What's is more important in one animation, Lights or Sound

For you! What is more important, content or technique

How important is the recognition, what I mean is...is absolutely necessary that both puppets and sets follow the same style/ appear to belong to the same family (1-5)

How important are the laws of animation (1-5)

For you! what has more fluid movement wire armature or ball & socket (1-5)

after answering the above question do you think the materials should be applied according to the function of the puppet (Silicon, Latex Foam, Latex) meaning one needs to know how they behave? yes/no

I don't want to bother you with more questions... BUT

Would you be willing to answer more and don't think I would be abusing? Yes/No

Views: 922

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Name: Leevi Lehtinen

Animations you have worked on: (EGO), Harmonica, The Stones, Poesia Fantasia etc.

Position in the team(s): Director, animator, DP etc.

 

For you! What is the major difference between stop motion and Computer animation

Is it important to leave clues like fingerprints and small defects so audiences know that is manufactured (1-5)

- (5) Hard to answer. The answer coul've been (1) as well. IMO, it's not important to fix and smooth out everything, but it's not important either to deliberately leave fingerprints.  Still, it's important that film is clearly made by a  craftsman. It has more in it that just a few fingerprints.  

Stop motion benefits from 3D Printing (1-5)

- (4) 3D printing is just a tool, like any other. It may save some time and add control in preparation phase. Still, it's not a game changer, as live video preview was.

Should Stop motion use CG effects Yes/No (just a little is a yes :P)

- (Yes) Why not if it benefits the final product. If it doesn't benefit, then why yes.

having a Making-off is important (1-5) | Why...

- (5) Small things like that add value to the final product. Fans like to see more than just a film. They want to experience the product.

For you! What's is more important in one animation, Lights or Sound 

- For me lights are more important, because I'm a DP and don't do sounds. But for an animation film sounds (including music) is a lot more important that lights. It's often said that sounds make up 50% of the strength of a film. 

For you! What is more important, content or technique

- Content of course. One is fool to answer otherwise.

How important is the recognition, what I mean is...is absolutely necessary that both puppets and sets follow the same style/ appear to belong to the same family (1-5)

- (1) Inconsistencies are often more interesting than consistencies.

How important are the laws of animation (1-5)

- (5) Laws are extremely important as is breaking them.

For you! what has more fluid movement wire armature or ball & socket (1-5)

- Good B&S armature is better than wire, but good wire armature is better than bad B&S.

after answering the above question do you think the materials should be applied according to the function of the puppet (Silicon, Latex Foam, Latex) meaning one needs to know how they behave? yes/no

- (yes) Of course one needs to know how the puppet should function and what is the best technique for that. The technique also depends of style, budget, deadline etc.

I don't want to bother you with more questions... BUT

Would you be willing to answer more and don't think I would be abusing? Yes/No

- (yes)

Thank you very much Leevi!
You have been most helpful!

Just out of curiosity, who are your masters?

Lord Vader and And Poh form Teletubbies

Greco... now you better answer that sh*t! or you are either getting stunned or hugged!

grecodan said:

Just out of curiosity, who are your masters?

Name: Daniel Molitor

Animations you have worked on: My own: Eye of God (2012), Commute (in production)

Position in the team(s): Hopeless amateur wannabe

 

For you! What is the major difference between stop motion and Computer animation

Stop motion allows the artist to place more of him/herself into the animation. The hands-on process connects the artist directly to the art, unlike CGI, in which the computer acts as a filter between the art and the artist. 

Is it important to leave clues like fingerprints and small defects so audiences know that is manufactured (1-5)

That depends entirely on the project. That being said, ALL movies are manufactured. If the technique becomes more important than the story (if there is one), then I suppose you'd want to call attention to it. If the story and characters are most important, believability is key. And note that "believability" does not necessarily equate to "realistic." 

Stop motion benefits from 3D Printing (1-5)

It's a tool, like any other. I think it does detract slightly from the animator's ability to be spontaneous, but clearly it makes wonderful things possible, e.g. ParaNorman.

Should Stop motion use CG effects Yes/No (just a little is a yes :P)

Yes, if it's called for. They shouldn't be used just for the sake of using them.

having a Making-of is important (1-5) | Why...

Is it important?

For you! What's is more important in one animation, Lights or Sound

Totally depends on the project and scene. Eye of God tried to make use of both. In some scenes the sound was critical. In other scenes the ideas were conveyed by different colored lighting effects.

For you! What is more important, content or technique

Content. Story is king.

How important is the recognition, what I mean is...is absolutely necessary that both puppets and sets follow the same style/ appear to belong to the same family (1-5)

I would think that would be important. But there have been plenty of exceptions, for example, where physical puppets were animated in a very cartoonish cut-out world.

How important are the laws of animation (1-5)

To animators, they are critical. To truck drivers, not so much.

For you! what has more fluid movement wire armature or ball & socket (1-5)

Ball & socket. Although the ones I make aren't all that fluid. :(

after answering the above question do you think the materials should be applied according to the function of the puppet (Silicon, Latex Foam, Latex) meaning one needs to know how they behave? yes/no

Yes, absolutely. The puppet is a tool. You have to have the right tool for the job.

Thanks Greco means a lot! 

Oh, I thought you were looking for answers from professionals - but if you're taking answers from basement hacks then I can jump in here too!  

Animations you have worked on:

A bunch of tests and practice shots, plus a small handful of assorted micro-shorts. Currently working on my first real short tentatively called Cosmo's. 

Position in the team(s):

I yell at myself a lot so I can feel important, then I sharpen pencils and sweep the floor. And everything else. 

For you! What is the major difference between stop motion and Computer animation

I suppose the major difference is that stopmotion is actually a performance done straight through one time, with no going back and inserting new frames or changing poses or adding second or third passes to sweeten things up - it all needs to be done straight through in one sitting. You're actually acting through those puppets a frame at a time - acting in slow motion. Not that CG animators don't act, but theu can always go back and make changes at any stage of the game - we don't have that luxury, so there's quite literally a sense of taking a deep breath, steeling yourself, and going out under those hot lights. If you make a mistake you either have to find a way to salvage it on the fly or scrap the shot and start over. 

Is it important to leave clues like fingerprints and small defects so audiences know that is manufactured (1-5)

I don't deliberately leave fingerprints - well wait I take that back, I actually did deliberately leave fingerprints sculpted into my miniature bottles because I didn't want them to look mass produced. So sometimes I guess it is important to me. Normally though I find if I try my best to do everything as perfectly as I can there will always be imperfections (that's actually a euphemis - they're more like huge glaring errors really) that show the handmade nature of it. For example I actually like a little bit of pop and stutter in my animation - not so it's obvious, but just subtle. You always saw it in Harrhausen's work, and if it wasn't there it would lose some of that otherworldly magic. But again, if I try my best to animate as smoothly as possible I usually end up with just enough flutter to keep it looking the way I want. Sometimes too much, and then I have to reshoot or live with it. 

Also, in setbuilding and puppetmaking for instance, precision doesn't seem to be in my DNA. Try as I might I can't make things all perfect and smooth, so you'll never see me working for Laika. But I avoid modern slick surfaces and mass-produced objects and I favor primitive or handmade structures, organic forms etc. My style is lopsided chic

Stop motion benefits from 3D Printing (1-5)

Oh definitely! I'm not sure where on a numerical scale Oh Definitely would be, I guess a 5. Laika sure is making it work, aren't they? But that's high tech, expensive stuff, beyond the reach of most of us basement hacks. But I do believe that having pre-made faces or face parts that you can select from in a big box can actually free up the animator in many regards (not that I actually do lip sync or anything like that - but hey I do read a lot about this stuff!). It seems to me having to reshape a plasticene mouth and eyebrows with tiny tweezers in an awkward position leaning out over a set with a light burning the back of your neck time after time would be pretty stress-inducing, where-as being able to pop out mouth 27M and replace it with mouth 43LL would simplify things. Of course, that's possible without the new 3D printing technology, but the tech means thy can now make a lot more subtle variations of expression than would be possible if they were all individually re-sculpted by hand and little molds and casts made, like in the old days. 

Should Stop motion use CG effects Yes/No (just a little is a yes :P)

Yes, whatever fits. CG isn't the enemy of stopmotion - they've both benefited from the explosion of computer programs developed basically as a result of ILM starting way back on Star Wars when computers were just beginning to become important to filmmaking. The same digital compositing and cleanup that are used in CGI have also supercharged modern stopmotion - folks, this ain't your grandaddy's Gumby anymore! (Hey - I resent that! I grew up watching Gumby!)

having a Making-of is important (1-5) | Why...


It's not always important, though it can be fun and it can be very informative. Sometimes though it's better to just let the film stand on it's own and not think about how it was made. For instnce, as an animation/stopmotion student I'd love to see behind the scenes stuff onhow the Brothers Quay worked their Eastern European style film magic, but as a viewer, it would kill a lot of that magic for me. But on a more commercial production like a Laika film, I love the way Laike releases a series of short behind the scenes videos before each new film comes out - it lets you into this wonderful Willy Wonka factory where it's all being done and lets you see the cutting edge of latest technology. Also seeing those amazing people build towns in teacups make you feel like you need to step your game up a bit. Plus I;ll say this - behind the scenes featurettes are a lot more fun on a physical production that uses miniatures and mechanical effects than they are on an all CGI film - I don't care to see a bunch of people sitting in cubicles staring at computer monitors and talking about pixels and vectors and spline curves.

For you! What's is more important in one animation, Lights or Sound

Both. Along with production design, writing, directing, good animation, and just general all-around coolness. 

For you! What is more important, content or technique

Is your question mark key broken? 

The heart of this question basically is "are you a formalist or not?" A formalist, like Lynch or Kubrick, is a director who believes strongly in technique and the way it can be used to actually shape the viewing experience. At heart I am a formalist - I love those old experimental films from the 60's and psychedelic movies like Head (with The Monkeys - yeah THAT the Monkeys) and in stopmotion I love really crazy surreal stuff like the Quays and Svankmejer and this totally wild clay stuff done by Bruce Bickford. But I also try to balance that out - I do love a good story. So I guess I'm a little conflicted on this point - I haven't really found my way there yet and hopefully I get it worked out soon. But I have a feeling I'll always be doing a balancing act between the two. And that might not be good - I think you need to either do one or the other or else find some good way to combine them in the same project. They key word here being good. 

How important is the recognition, what I mean is...is absolutely necessary that both puppets and sets follow the same style/ appear to belong to the same family (1-5)


That's another thing I struggle with a bit. On the film I'm making now I had heads made by someone else, in this crazy wacked-out lopsided style, and I did my best to try to match that when making the puppet bodies and the set, and even though as I said try as I might everything I make is lopsided, it isn't necessarily in the same style as Scott Radke's heads. They're lopsided in a really great artistic way, and my stuff is more just haphazardly lopsided - except when I use pre-cut wood to build sets, then everything naturally comes out straight with nice square corners, when a more wavy and uneven look would have worked better. 

Ultimately I love a film with a great integrated production design like Coraline or ParaNorman, or the grandaddy of them all A Nightmare Before Christmas, but in my own work I have a hard time designing things and then making them come out the way I drew them. I usually just get an idea in my head and then work from that. I'm not saying I recommend that approach by the way. 

How important is it on a scale of 1 to 5? I don't know - like I said I do love a well-integrated production design, bjut I also love films where the puppets don't necessarily match the sets. It all boils down to whether it works or not, as most things do. In fact, can I just paste that answer in for all these questions?  

How important are the laws of animation (1-5)

10. Not laws though - principles. Laws implies that you always have to do it that way or you'll get thrown in bad animator's jail. It's utterly important to understand the principles - at least a few of them like ease-in/ease-out and what's known in technical terms as seaweed-motion, then anticipation and follow-through. If you only grasp those three principles, that's all you need - you can bring life to your creations and beginners will drool in awe. I believe all good animators know the principles, whether they read about them or not - becoming a good animator basically means learning these principles. You don't need to know what they're called or who invented them, but in order to make your animation really work, you do need to understand them. 

And to address what my comrade Dan said, the principles of truck-driving are vitally important to truck-drivers. 

As you'll hear from just about everybody who answers, a good ball and socket armature is smooth as silk, but they also cost an arm and a leg. You don't get that kind of movement from the little armature kits you can buy online - at least not that Im aware of, though some of them might be pretty decent now. I know a couple of companies have been making better kits in recent years. I haven't tried any of them since my beginning days when I bought one of the most basic generic kits and it was totally frustrating. At one time wire armatures were the redheaded stepchild of stopmotion because the wire doesn't stay exactly where you bend it - it slwoly springs back a little bit. But with today's framegrabbers you can really get an amazing performance out of a wire armature - far better than from a cheap machined armature and even inthe hands of a good animator better than some of the older stuff from the 70's and before that was done with really good armatures. Before the framegrabbed an animator relied mostly on a good smooth armature to get good results - that and using surface gages which you place in the shot while moving the puppet as a reference point and remove before you snap the frame, and a lot of experience. Now with computer-aided tools you can see exactly where every part of the puppet was in the last few frames and exactly how it's moving before you take the frame. When you nderstand how to use a framegrabber properly, you really can get animation just as smooth as you want if you have the patience and know your principles.

after answering the above question do you think the materials should be applied according to the function of the puppet (Silicon, Latex Foam, Latex) meaning one needs to know how they behave? yes/no

Yes and no. Sure, it's important to know how different materials act, but there are people who can do just about anything with just a few materials. It isn't necessary to buy and try every newfangled material that comes out - just start off with a few good materials like good old liquid latex and fabric and aluminum armature wire and epoxy putty and you can make great films with nothing more. It's a matter of finding what works for you. Some of us work magis with plasticene - personally I don't have the patience or the fortitude to re-sculpt my puppets in between each frame, so I use rubber and wire. I've messed with silicone, which everybody and their kid brother seems to be using for puppet these days, but it's hard to paint and I tend to like the more organic look of latex as opposed to the slick modern look of silicone. 

I went through and corrected every typo i nthat message, but apparently it took more than the 15 minute editing period (really? that long?) so when I clicked to post the changes nothing happened and now it is what it is. If only the editing period were half an hour, then my response would sound a lot more coherent. 

I'll see if I can change it.

Thanks Anthony - I hope you can! I've run into this problem several times now. 

Well unfortunately...

We don't have any plans to change this limit. Keeping it at 15 minutes ensures that as the conversations expands, people can't go back and change what they said earlier. 15 minutes allows for enough time for members to edit for typos or correct statements, but not enough time to come back later and change what they said, preserving the discussion.

/Evan
Ning Product Manager
▶ Reply

Ok well thanks for checking. 

I do understand that point. Unfortunatley though if you write long posts it can take a while to edit the typos and correct grammar. Oh well, I can live with it. 

Reply to Discussion

RSS

MESSAGE BOARD CATEGORIES

STOPMO NEWBIES
basic stopmo discussion

ANIMATOR TALK
experienced animators looking to improve

CAMERA & STAGE
animation camera, lighting and moco rigs

ANIMATION TOOLS & EQUIPMENT
animation tool and rigging discussion

STOP MOTION & COMPUTERS
frame capture, editing, and post-production

STORY
script, storyboarding and storyreel discussion

SOUND
lip-sync, sound effects and music

YOUR STOPMO FILM PROJECT
discuss your stopmo film

ARMATURES
ball & socket and wire armature discussion

MACHINE SHOP
metalwork tool & talk

SCULPTING
sculpture information and advice

HAIR & COSTUME
materials, patterns and technique

CASTING
foam, silicone and resin

CLAY
clay puppet construction

GENERAL PUPPET MAKING
other puppet fabrication issues

STOP MOTION SETS
set design and construction information

MODEL DEPARTMENT
miniature prop discussion

MATTE PAINTINGS
glass matte paintings and backgrounds

GENERAL SPECIAL EFFECTS

STOP MOTION FILM DISCUSSION

FAVORITE STOP MOTION CHARACTERS

PRO ANIMATOR DISCUSSION

FILM FESTIVALS AND EVENTS

ANIMATION SCHOOLS

STOP MOTION BOOKS

STOP MOTION ON VIDEO

JOBS & PROJECTS
post here if you are looking for talent to hire

SWAP MEET
stop motion items for sale

CHAT BOARD
general discussion

SITE FEEDBACK
report bugs, comments and suggestions here

Latest Activity

Elliott DeGiovine replied to Anthony Scott's discussion Please Introduce Yourself
"Hey there, my name's Elliott and I joined this site to help me learn about stop-motion from…"
1 hour ago
Xiakeyra posted a video

Baby Yoda Clay Animation test

stop motion clay animation test about baby Yoda, the cute Star Wars character from "The Mandalorian" series.
yesterday
Simon Tytherleigh replied to Jet Zhang's discussion Shining skin on foam latex
"If you were using platinum silicone, it would be inhibited by the latex, so the logical method…"
yesterday
phelps/cota updated their profile
yesterday

© 2019   Created by Anthony Scott.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

.xg_widget_forum_index_index .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;} .xg_widget_forum_topic_listForCategory .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;} .xg_widget_forum_topic_show .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;}