Hi there !

Im new inside the community and all of the site aportations are helping me a lot because I need to do an Stop Motion college final work for my career, and I wanted to know if anyone could help me by telling me some nice set tutorials/tips and puppet tips to make a furried beast of almost 30 cm for each arm. I am making a wired armature using different aluminium wires and epoxy miliput superfine white and maybe some wood parts. It would be awesome to hear some tips and opinions!! I attach some copyright protected images from the puppet concept too and the set.

Regiux.

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Wow, that puppet has huge arms and hands. So even though the body is about 210mm tall, it has to support arms with a total span of about 700mm. I hope you are using plenty of wires to be able to hold them up, and keeping the hands as light as possible.

Bear in mind that you need somewhere to grip the puppet, so a chest piece made of balsa would be good, and this can be used for arms too. Fur tends to boil (move around when being animated) so needs to be treated with PVA to make it stiffer.

Have a look through the threads on this site where I am sure there are examples of people's work. Look at any of Stopmonick's YouTube videos to get tips on how to do it!

Thanks for the reply !! I'll take that advice and apply it !

Simon Tytherleigh said:

Wow, that puppet has huge arms and hands. So even though the body is about 210mm tall, it has to support arms with a total span of about 700mm. I hope you are using plenty of wires to be able to hold them up, and keeping the hands as light as possible.

Bear in mind that you need somewhere to grip the puppet, so a chest piece made of balsa would be good, and this can be used for arms too. Fur tends to boil (move around when being animated) so needs to be treated with PVA to make it stiffer.

Have a look through the threads on this site where I am sure there are examples of people's work. Look at any of Stopmonick's YouTube videos to get tips on how to do it!

 How do you properly make furry creatures? I made a minotaur (which looks awesome) but is basically paralyzed from the waist down due to the fur not being flexible



Simon Tytherleigh said:

Wow, that puppet has huge arms and hands. So even though the body is about 210mm tall, it has to support arms with a total span of about 700mm. I hope you are using plenty of wires to be able to hold them up, and keeping the hands as light as possible.

Bear in mind that you need somewhere to grip the puppet, so a chest piece made of balsa would be good, and this can be used for arms too. Fur tends to boil (move around when being animated) so needs to be treated with PVA to make it stiffer.

Have a look through the threads on this site where I am sure there are examples of people's work. Look at any of Stopmonick's YouTube videos to get tips on how to do it!

Depending on the length of the film, I would recommend a variety of tactics. If it's a long film involving lots of running or walking as seen from the waist up, I would recommend making a separate puppet from the waist up basically on a bicycle mechanism, to make it smooth but mainly so that your full-shot puppet doesn't break in your first scene. Also, could you tell me what wire you use? My puppets have a bad habit of breaking shortly after creation. I would love to see the finished project so let us know when it's done!

The legs will need to be strong to support those arms!   2 strands of the 1/8th" armature wire might do it.  I'd go to 3 strands but the legs are also very short so 3 strands might be too hard to bend.

Furry Creatures:

Sometimes you can stick the fake fur fabric on, especially if it is the kind with a stretchy back.  I did that for the body of a couple of puppets.  To help it flex I cut lot of little slits in the backing with small nail scissors, and didn't glue it all over, so they could open up when the puppet flexed.  But often the thickness of the fur fabric is too much, it hides all the detail and makes the shape way too too fat and sausage-like.  A better way, as I did on the legs of this Lioclops, is to glue just the hairs in strips, working in layers, each layer overlapping the one before.  You don't get the thickness of the backing and the wooly under layer of fur that the better fabrics have.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSdRz8PMx4c 

The other method I've used is flocking, but it requires an electrostatic flocking gun so the flock fibres all land end-on.  You paint the area to be furred with a flexible flocking glue (or wet silicone if it is a silicone puppet) and the gun charges up the fibres with a positive and negative end, and they spray out and are attracted to the puppet.  The ones in the glue stick, then you let it dry.  I usually blow the hairs gently to give it a direction, otherwise they stick staring up.   Leoclops had some flocking down near the ankles where I wanted shorter hairs.  He gets away with it because you don't see the legs in close-up, it's either a wide shot or closer on the head and upper body.  Flocking is mostly very short though, so everything covered with flock has this short 'n fuzzy look.

 This rat had a piece of fur fabric over the body, with flocking for the short hairs on its face:    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33KElmMfKtc  It works on the body, but on limbs they would end up fat and cylindrical.  You can trim the fur a bit, but that takes of the longer guard hairs and shows more of the fuzzy underlayer.

There are several videos on YouTube showing how to make doll wigs. These use a base of stretchy material with either latex or PVA, then glue on the hair wefts. For your skin, if it is latex, you can just apply the wefts directly with liquid latex, overlapping so you don't see the glue. Then it will stretch with the skin.

Here's a clip of some hounds of hell I made with latex skins, much like Bluworm's method. I used the same mould for both heads, but changed the shape of the head armature underneath to make variations. The overall effect was intended to make them look mangy, so I coloured the latex skin first, then added the fur sparingly, then coloured again after where needed. PVA was used to stiffen and clump the fur.

Hey Simon,  I don't see a link to the clip of the hell hounds.  I'd like to see them!

Thanks for the info! I watched a lot of your tutorials and read some guides from the forums, I have a question though, would you recommend me making the hands of the puppet by casting in silicone or by latex layering around the armature?

StopmoNick said:

The legs will need to be strong to support those arms!   2 strands of the 1/8th" armature wire might do it.  I'd go to 3 strands but the legs are also very short so 3 strands might be too hard to bend.

Furry Creatures:

Sometimes you can stick the fake fur fabric on, especially if it is the kind with a stretchy back.  I did that for the body of a couple of puppets.  To help it flex I cut lot of little slits in the backing with small nail scissors, and didn't glue it all over, so they could open up when the puppet flexed.  But often the thickness of the fur fabric is too much, it hides all the detail and makes the shape way too too fat and sausage-like.  A better way, as I did on the legs of this Lioclops, is to glue just the hairs in strips, working in layers, each layer overlapping the one before.  You don't get the thickness of the backing and the wooly under layer of fur that the better fabrics have.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aSdRz8PMx4c 

The other method I've used is flocking, but it requires an electrostatic flocking gun so the flock fibres all land end-on.  You paint the area to be furred with a flexible flocking glue (or wet silicone if it is a silicone puppet) and the gun charges up the fibres with a positive and negative end, and they spray out and are attracted to the puppet.  The ones in the glue stick, then you let it dry.  I usually blow the hairs gently to give it a direction, otherwise they stick staring up.   Leoclops had some flocking down near the ankles where I wanted shorter hairs.  He gets away with it because you don't see the legs in close-up, it's either a wide shot or closer on the head and upper body.  Flocking is mostly very short though, so everything covered with flock has this short 'n fuzzy look.

 This rat had a piece of fur fabric over the body, with flocking for the short hairs on its face:    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33KElmMfKtc  It works on the body, but on limbs they would end up fat and cylindrical.  You can trim the fur a bit, but that takes of the longer guard hairs and shows more of the fuzzy underlayer.

Sorry about that. I forgot to add the link.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ICXr4KKqNnE

StopmoNick said:

Hey Simon,  I don't see a link to the clip of the hell hounds.  I'd like to see them!

Thanks Simon.  Short clip but very cool!  Hounds look great, I like the sparsely furred effect with skin showing.  Would have liked some other angles, just see the front in this one, but what I see is perfect!

Here we are. A couple of stills. I have only animated that short clip so far, but it seemed to go well. They have ball and socket armatures and are able to stand on their hind legs. I think the paler fur works better for the mangy effect.

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Nice how the shoulder blades and hip bones stick out!  Yep, has just the right lean and hungry look.

I went for a similar mangy effect with my version of Brown Jenkin, but the scrawny body came up more hound-like than rat-like once you take away the thick fur.

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