I've made this paw out of clay and baked it. Now I would like to make a mold from it to create a replica using silicone. I bought some Rebound 25 to make the mold but I'm wondering if that's the best product to use especially since the paw is small. Any suggestions would be helpful. Thanks.

Views: 168

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Ideally you should follow the practice of casting something flexible in a rigid mould and vice versa. So you would not normally use a silicone mould to cast silicone. You could re-sculpt your hand and not bake it, then cast it in a plaster 2 part mould, and then create your final piece in silicone in the mould.

It is not impossible to use silicone moulds for silicone, but you need to make sure you have enough mould release on all surfaces and that the silicones you are using are compatible, i.e. do not try to cast platinum silicone in a tin silicone mould.

Thank you Simon.

Simon Tytherleigh said:

Ideally you should follow the practice of casting something flexible in a rigid mould and vice versa. So you would not normally use a silicone mould to cast silicone. You could re-sculpt your hand and not bake it, then cast it in a plaster 2 part mould, and then create your final piece in silicone in the mould.

It is not impossible to use silicone moulds for silicone, but you need to make sure you have enough mould release on all surfaces and that the silicones you are using are compatible, i.e. do not try to cast platinum silicone in a tin silicone mould.

yeah i agree with simon- this would be a very easy mold to make with plaster/hydrocal. 

i do however use rubber molds for pulling dragon skin pieces all the time. Mainly this is to benefit from using a product like sorta clear, where you pour the mold in one block, then cut it in half to save time. And yes- you can't use enough mold release, i've also managed to destroyed some. one other tip is the degree of undercutting- with your hand sculpt, there's none. so it would be easier to manage a silicone mold. good luck 

Thank you Ri, it can be difficult to navigate all the products for making molds as well as the products for making the final piece. Not to mention finding the products themselves as most stores don't have them (thank goodness for the internet, eh?). From the videos I've watched on the subject it appears to be a challenge (a fun one at least) and there's not just one way to success. I appreciate the time you (and Simon) took to answer my question.

Learn from each attempt you make, even, perhaps especially if it fails. If you get a method that works well for you, stick with it and make incremental improvements. There's a great video from Tested where they look at mould methods used by Aardman for Early Man.

Think about how you will fill the mould once you have made it. You need a big enough hole to pour silicone in, and one for air to escape, making sure there are no areas where it can be trapped. Or use the cruder method I like, which is to overfill both halves of the mould and slap it together before anything can run out too much. You still need an escape hole for the excess to come out, and will need to keep this uppermost while the stuff goes off. And you will waste more silicone this way. Aardman inject theirs, which is more complex to set up, but will use less material.

Thanks again Simon, that's some good information and I'm looking forward to seeing what I can come up with. In the mean time I picked up some 'bake and bend' sculpey and made a couple of hands with it. As you can see it worked somewhat  but I think the range of motion is a fair amount less then with latex or silicon. Still not a bad way to go in a pinch. 

Simon Tytherleigh said:

Learn from each attempt you make, even, perhaps especially if it fails. If you get a method that works well for you, stick with it and make incremental improvements. There's a great video from Tested where they look at mould methods used by Aardman for Early Man.

Think about how you will fill the mould once you have made it. You need a big enough hole to pour silicone in, and one for air to escape, making sure there are no areas where it can be trapped. Or use the cruder method I like, which is to overfill both halves of the mould and slap it together before anything can run out too much. You still need an escape hole for the excess to come out, and will need to keep this uppermost while the stuff goes off. And you will waste more silicone this way. Aardman inject theirs, which is more complex to set up, but will use less material.

Attachments:

where did you get the bake and bend stuff?  i've been looking for that for ages and can't find any!

I just happened upon it at Michaels (the hobby store).

Reply to Discussion

RSS

MESSAGE BOARD CATEGORIES

STOPMO NEWBIES
basic stopmo discussion

ANIMATOR TALK
experienced animators looking to improve

CAMERA & STAGE
animation camera, lighting and moco rigs

ANIMATION TOOLS & EQUIPMENT
animation tool and rigging discussion

STOP MOTION & COMPUTERS
frame capture, editing, and post-production

STORY
script, storyboarding and storyreel discussion

SOUND
lip-sync, sound effects and music

YOUR STOPMO FILM PROJECT
discuss your stopmo film

ARMATURES
ball & socket and wire armature discussion

MACHINE SHOP
metalwork tool & talk

SCULPTING
sculpture information and advice

HAIR & COSTUME
materials, patterns and technique

CASTING
foam, silicone and resin

CLAY
clay puppet construction

GENERAL PUPPET MAKING
other puppet fabrication issues

STOP MOTION SETS
set design and construction information

MODEL DEPARTMENT
miniature prop discussion

MATTE PAINTINGS
glass matte paintings and backgrounds

GENERAL SPECIAL EFFECTS

STOP MOTION FILM DISCUSSION

FAVORITE STOP MOTION CHARACTERS

PRO ANIMATOR DISCUSSION

FILM FESTIVALS AND EVENTS

ANIMATION SCHOOLS

STOP MOTION BOOKS

STOP MOTION ON VIDEO

JOBS & PROJECTS
post here if you are looking for talent to hire

SWAP MEET
stop motion items for sale

CHAT BOARD
general discussion

SITE FEEDBACK
report bugs, comments and suggestions here

Gumby Imagined, The Story of Art Clokey and His Creations

The ultimate Gumby retrospective packed with incredible photos and never-before-shared stories. Written by Art Clokey's children, Joan and Joe Clokey, this is the most comprehensive book ever published on Gumby, Davey and Goliath and their creator Art Clokey, a pioneer in stop-motion animation.

stopmo jam on Instagram

© 2018   Created by Anthony Scott.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

.xg_widget_forum_index_index .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;} .xg_widget_forum_topic_listForCategory .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;} .xg_widget_forum_topic_show .xg_column.xg_span-7.xg_last {display:none;}